I ***LOVE*** Summit Cheeseburgers!

February 14, 2010 at 10:03 am 2 comments

Valentines Day weekend. Humbug. With a name like Krusty Bunz, it’s no wonder I’m single, so I figured I may as well spend the weekend playing tourist around my new home and check out more of the local scenery.

My last post was about The Great Orme, an impressive (and somewhat famous) feature on the north shore of Wales. Saturday’s hike took me up the Little Orme (141m, 463ft) which sits south of the Great Orme and forms the southern boundary of a waterfront promenade, which is a feature attraction in the resort town of Llandudno in north Wales. Views of the Great Orme and Little Orme from the promenade:

The Great Orme from the promenade

The Great Orme from the promenade

Little Orme from the promenade

Little Orme from the promenade

With a mere three miles between the base of each Orme, it would probably be a morning well spent for a visitor to Wales to do a two cheeseburger summit-to-summit walk, with a pint of ale from the Great Orme Brewery to toast one’s accomplishment.

The hike up the Little Orme follows a well marked public footpath that ascends at an easy grade over pastures shared with sheep (which is true of pretty much any hike in Wales it seems). The views from the summit are quite excellent:

View of Great Orme from Little Orme

Looking west along the north shore of Wales from the Little Orme

For Sunday’s hike, I drove a short distance west along the north shore to Penmaenmawr for an ascent of Foel Lûs (362m), which is within the northern boundary of Snowdonia National Park. It’s a relatively easy hike, with several trail options to get you to the summit, but you eventually have to give up trying avoid stepping in sheep droppings if you want to make any progress at all.

At the summit is a ring of stones, which I suppose could provide a bit of shelter in bad weather for small children or badgers, or in my case, a cheeseburger.

Foel Lûs summit

The views from the summit look out at Snowdonia to the south and southwest, the Isle of Anglesey to the northwest, and the Great Orme and Little Orme to the north east.

Great Orme and Little Orme from the summit of Foel Lûs

On my return to the car, I came across a street sign pointing me towards the next town over. Despite standing there reading and photographing the sign, I still have no idea what the name of the town is. On a related note, the Star Trek writers that came up with the Klingon language leaned heavily on the Welsh language as a basis for Klingon. Any guesses on how to pronounce this…?

I'm sorry... were saying the name of a town or coughing up phlegm?

Krusty Bunz

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Entry filed under: International Summits.

Rounds Mountain, NY Mt Blackmore, Gallatin County, Montana

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. sirloinofbeef  |  February 14, 2010 at 10:45 pm

    Pat, I’d like to buy a vowel.

    Reply
  • 2. samh  |  February 15, 2010 at 9:03 am

    I looked up Dwygyfylchi on Wikipedia in hopes of discovering how to pronounce it. No such luck, but I did find out that “Nearby are the popular attractions of Bwlch Sychnant (Sychnant Pass) and Mynydd y Dref…”

    Yes, Pat, I would like to buy all the vowels.

    Reply

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The Mission

To encourage, enable, and document the consumption of a Cheeseburger on every summit on earth.

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